Diversity at KPMG

Diversity at KPMG

Creating an inclusive culture where all our people achieve their potential is fundamental to our business.

Creating a culture where our people achieve their potential is fundamental.

We believe that diverse teams better reflect the varied nature of our clients’ businesses. They express different viewpoints and create well-rounded perspectives that contribute to innovative thinking and better business solutions.

KPMG sponsors Irish Olympic Boxing Champion Katie Taylor - pictured here speaking at a KPMG supported I Wish event in Cork designed to encourage female students to take science, engineering, technology and maths (STEM) subjects.

Plan International Ireland

As part of our commitment to gender diversity and coinciding with International Women's Day 2016, KPMG in Ireland has announced a three-year partnership with Plan International Ireland, aimed at empowering marginalised young women in Sri Lanka. As part of the project, over 500 young women from plantations and rural villages will be brought together in community-based groups for training in financial literacy and management, ICT and household economic security as well as micro-enterprise development. Read more here.

Why gender diversity matters

At KPMG we also believe that organisations with more women at senior level are proven to be more successful. They have greater success because they reflect their clients and customers and because they retain more talent - thereby growing their overall talent pool. This makes business sense and is inherently the 'right thing to do.'

Our commitment to gender diversity

Along with internal programmes to help contribute to gender diversity at every level, KPMG is proud to lead and support a wide range of programmes to promote gender diversity in Irish business.

30% Club Ireland

KPMG is a founding member of the 30% Club in Ireland whose objective is to achieve a minimum of 30% female participation at board level. Speaking about KPMG’s lead involvement in the 30% Club, KPMG partner Darina Barrett says the 30% Club “Takes gender diversity beyond a narrow definition of the issue into mainstream talent management - that’s what gets not just the attention of business leaders but also helps turn increasingly positive attitudes into action.” Gender balance on boards not only encourages better leadership and governance - diversity further contributes to better all-round board performance, and ultimately increased corporate performance for both companies and their shareholders.

Going for Growth

KPMG is proud to support Going for Growth in association with Enterprise Ireland. The overall aim is to support Irish female entrepreneurs through a results driven mentoring programme featuring a wide range of successful Irish businesswomen. More than 12,000 women in Ireland set up new businesses each year - yet we believe that there is still significant untapped potential amongst female entrepreneurs with research indicating that only one in three Irish women have a positive view of their entrepreneurial capabilities.

Olivia Lynch is the KPMG partner leading our involvement in Going for Growth. Commenting on the benefits of the programme, Olivia says “Going for Growth provides female entrepreneurs with a focus on specific growth driven goals and specific calendar based milestones. In 2016, this award winning programme will support almost one hundred female entrepreneurs in growing their business.” Participants aim to significantly increase their turnover and expect to make considerable additional economic impact in terms of jobs creation and export sales.

Diversity charter

KPMG is proud to support the Diversity Charter Ireland. In signing this charter, organisations in Ireland join their counterparts across Europe in publically stating their commitment to inclusion and diversity.


KPMG is a founding partner of Cork based I WISH (Inspiring Women in STEM) an initiative to inspire, encourage and motivate young secondary school female students to pursue careers in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths) where there are traditionally lower levels of female participation. According to KPMG partner Caroline O’Driscoll who leads KPMG’s involvement in this initiative; “Too few women are entering Science, Technology, Engineering or Mathematics subject areas. In 2014 only one in six (17%) of entrants to third level courses in ICT were female, a figure that has been consistent since 2004. Meanwhile only less than a quarter (24%) of engineering entrants are female. The situation is even more challenging in Maths, with just 22% of female entrants in 2014 compared to 35% in 2004. I WISH aims to change the status quo with an ambition to increase female entrants to third level courses in STEM to 30% by 2020.”

Encouraging female students in STEM with Katie Taylor

Video: Encouraging female students in STEM with Katie Taylor at I Wish 2016

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