Our thinking | KPMG | CEE

Our thinking

Our thinking

We collaborate with business and academia to drive insight on Inclusion & Diversity.

We collaborate with business and academia to drive insight on Inclusion & Diversity.

We are empowering change by drawing on our relationships and expertise to build evidence and outline practical actions to help Inclusion & Diversity efforts move in the right direction. In partnership with academia and global organizations, we’ve published thought leadership pieces that move the dial on gender equality.

KPMG’s collaboration with the 30% Club and YSC on the 2016 ‘Cracking the Code’ global research examines women’s progress within corporate talent pipelines around the globe.

KPMG Australia’s report on She’s Price(d)less: The economics of the gender pay gap, for the Diversity Council Australia and the Workplace Gender Equality Agency uses structured econometric modelling to determine the factors that underpin the gap, and to what extent they contribute to the issue. This in depth research was accompanied by an Executive Companion that gave practical steps business could take to move towards pay equity by leveraging the insights and initiatives of leading Australian companies. Critically, the research also found that despite the endeavors of government and business, the size of the gap, and in particular the role of gender discrimination, has remained stagnant in the past seven years. 

KPMG in the US released the fifth “Women in Alternative Investments Report” showcasing the investment insights of 800 women investment professionals globally,  from every major geographic region and sector within alternatives - hedge funds, private equity, venture capital, and real estate. They shared their aspirations for women’s advancement, their views on mandates, and their beliefs regarding which regions offer the greatest opportunities for women in the industry. Although much has changed in this sector since the first report women remain under-represented in the industry. Yet there is reason for hope with new trends, new initiatives and new opportunities for women. 

KPMG in the UK sponsored the Hampton-Alexander review with the aim of increasing the number of female executives at Britain’s 350 biggest public companies. This work follows on from the work of Lord Davies, whose recommendations in 2011 led to FTSE 100 companies increasing female board representation from 12.5 percent to 26 percent. With the FTSE 350 companies having been asked to build the representation of women on their boards to 33 percent, and British business in its 6th year of progress to increase the number of women in the boardroom, it is time to apply a similar framework to improving the number of women in the all-important leadership roles below the board.  To advance this, there has recently been a voluntary target of 33 percent representation of women for FTSE 100 executive pipeline by 2020 announced.

The first national Think Future Study from the 30% Club and KPMG finds that female students are significantly more likely than their male peers to believe that gender will influence pay and career progression.