UK maintains overall tax competitiveness score but is leapfrogged by Ireland in rankings according to KPMG annual survey

UK maintains overall tax competitiveness score bu...

The UK has built on its 2013 absolute score in terms of the frequency with which respondents cite it as being in their top three most competitive tax regimes but it has slipped to second place overall.

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The UK remains one of the most competitive tax destinations according to over 100 of the largest British-based businesses* participating in KPMG’s annual survey of tax competitiveness 2014. But Ireland has leapfrogged the UK to take the number one position this year. 

In this year’s results, the UK has built on its 2013 absolute score in terms of the frequency with which respondents cite it as being in their top three most competitive tax regimes but it has slipped to second place overall. Luxembourg, the Netherlands, and Switzerland have all lost ground in the rankings as the table below shows.

Summary: Overall, which of the following countries do you think has the most competitive tax regime... and which do you think has the second most competitive tax regime... and which do you think has the third most competitive tax regime? ANY MENTION.

Base size: all respondents (104).  Other countries were also listed plus an option of “other” or “none”.

Chris Morgan, head of tax policy at KPMG in the UK, said: “This year, respondents’ perception of how attractive Ireland’s tax regime is compared to other countries jumped significantly, with Ireland most frequently cited among the top three most attractive tax regimes overall. Perceptions of the UK’s attractiveness improved slightly versus 2013 but not enough to retain the top spot in the 2014 rankings.

“In contrast, the tax regimes in Luxembourg, Switzerland and the Netherlands are viewed as less attractive in 2014, perhaps due to significant proposed changes in tax regimes (especially in Switzerland), increased regulatory scrutiny on tax issues and concerns about tax rulings and EU State Aid issues (in the EU countries). While Ireland has also come in for criticism from some quarters on its tax policies, it appears that companies accept its very clear cross party commitment to retaining the low rate and believe that Ireland will introduce further measures like an Intellectual Property box regime to maintain its competitiveness.”

Responsibility and transparency in tax important to business

For the first time this year, the survey expressly asked about responsibility in business. Respondents agreed that responsible business should act in the interest of the common good and that tax was integral to this. Additionally, a significant proportion of respondents (38 percent) said they had become more transparent on how they report tax in the last 12 months. 44 percent felt they would be more transparent in the future, with this particularly pronounced among the FTSE 100 where just over half said so.


In light of the tone of the media and political debate concerning tax, have you become more/less transparent in how you report tax charges in the last 12 months? Would you say...Base size: all respondents (104)

Little appetite for further radical change to system – simplicity and stability are what is wanted

In a similar vein to last year’s results, respondents believe that stability and simplicity determine the attractiveness of a tax system.  Respondents were keen to see the corporate tax rate go down to 20 percent as planned by the current government. Respondents felt that this reduction was more important than a cut to business rates and almost a quarter (23 percent) saying they would increase their headcount as a result of this measure. There was relatively little support for tax devolution, with 63 percent saying it should not be decentralised and 27 percent saying it should be decentralised in line with devolution. A similar proportion (66 percent) was opposed to an allowance for corporate equity, which is a deduction based on the amount of share capital in order to level the playing field between equity and debt.

Chris Morgan commented: “According to our survey, stabilising and simplifying the tax system are the two most important measures to prioritise to drive growth over the next year.  However, given that simplification would inevitably involve change to the system, there is a natural tension between these factors. The general sentiment seems to be that it makes sense to allow recent changes made to the tax system to ‘bed in’ before introducing any additional measures.”

Support for the OECD’s ‘BEPS’ action plan among respondents but concerns about compliance and UK interests

Looking to the wider tax landscape, a clear majority (76 percent) of respondents were supportive of the general aims of the OECD’s Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (BEPS) action plan. However, 61 percent expressed some concerns around the potential compliance burden of country by country reporting and over half (56 percent) of respondents felt that the UK authorities were unable to influence the overall BEPS agenda.

Chris Morgan commented: “Respondents are clearly supportive of the aims of the BEPS action plan but they do have some concerns. In particular, a significant minority believes that some work-streams could have a negative impact on the UK and more than half expressed concerns about the potential compliance burden of country by country reporting.”

In conclusion, Chris Morgan said: “It’s encouraging that the UK has held its overall score on tax competitiveness this year which suggests respondents remain broadly content with the direction of travel on UK tax policy.  Ireland may have leapfrogged into the top spot but the results suggest that has been a result of it taking ‘votes’ from other European competitors rather than the UK. Respondents seem broadly happy with the direction of travel in terms of tax reform and support the OECD’s efforts to reform the international tax system.  The sentiment among the senior tax executives we spoke to appears to be one of ‘steady as she goes’ rather than any urgent calls for radical reforms.”

Please click here to view the full survey.


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For further information please contact:

Margot Cowhig, KPMG Corporate Communications

T: 0207 694 4246

M: 07920 274856


KPMG Press Office: 0207 694 8773


* KPMG’s Annual Tax Competitiveness Survey 2014 is based on interviews conducted with 104 senior tax decision makers in the largest UK listed companies and foreign-owned subsidiaries in September/October 2014 by Gulland Padfield, the specialist consultancy. The sample size is similar to the 2013 study and double that of previous years, where the survey aimed for 50 respondents (57 in 2012). The sample size was increased in 2013 in order to make the research more robust and allow scope for greater sector comparisons.

62% of the companies interviewed had a turnover of over £1bn. 28 of the companies interviewed were members of the FTSE 100, 51 in the FTSE 250 and 25 Foreign Subsidiaries.


About KPMG

KPMG LLP, a UK limited liability partnership, operates from 22 offices across the UK with approximately 11,500 partners and staff.  The UK firm recorded a turnover of £1.8 billion in the year ended September 2013. KPMG is a global network of professional firms providing Audit, Tax, and Advisory services. It operates in 155 countries and has 155,000 professionals working in member firms around the world. The independent member firms of the KPMG network are affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative ("KPMG International"), a Swiss entity.  Each KPMG firm is a legally distinct and separate entity and describes itself as such.

This article represents the views of the author only, and does not necessarily represent the views or professional advice of KPMG in the UK.

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