Healthcare reimagined: short and long-term future | KPMG | AU
close
Share with your friends

Healthcare reimagined: KPMG examines the short and long-term future

Healthcare reimagined: short and long-term future

At-home patient monitoring using tele-health platforms, allowing remote caregivers to be notified in real time of any incidents – that is the near future of Australian healthcare outlined in a new KPMG paper. The report assesses likely short, medium and long-term changes from the perspective of consumers and healthcare providers.

1000

Also on KPMG.com

Healthcare reimagined examines key trends and predictions in healthcare, especially the disconnect between consumer expectations and the current patient experience, emerging technologies and treatment innovation – with the more pervasive shift towards connected healthcare.

The report argues that an ageing population, rising demands, huge medical advances and limited financial resources means major reforms to our health systems will be essential.

 

 
 
 

 

 

 

 

Healthcare reimagined examines key trends and predictions in healthcare, especially the disconnect between consumer expectations and the current patient experience, emerging technologies and treatment innovation – with the more pervasive shift towards connected healthcare.
The report argues that an ageing population, rising demands, huge medical advances and limited financial resources means major reforms to our health systems will be essential.

In the short-term

Healthcare on demand/personalised, connected health. The current focus on pro-active wellness (food, exercise, behaviours) will continue, as will digital engagement – with consumer-held electronic medical records allowing patients access to information, advice and treatment when it suits them.

Treatment innovation: over the next 5-10 years we will see

  • A substantial increase in precision medicine and the prevention and treatment of diseases by gene therapy within 5 years.
  • 3D printing playing a more central role in medical practice – we will see 3D printed casts that heal bones up to 40-80 percent faster than traditional casts, 3D printed pills that alter drug release rates and the evolution of bio printing beyond human tissue.
  • Wearables, digestibles and implantables: Australians have already embraced wearables to track their wellness. Over the next five years we expect consumer-collected data to play an increasingly important role in prevention, diagnosis and treatment and to enable patients and their treating clinicians to work in partnership to support their health and wellness.
  • Human augmentation: currently sensory and mobility aids are used to help people with disabilities and impairments live fuller lives - in the next 10 years we will see a shift beyond this towards the enhancement of human abilities.

Liz Forsyth, KPMG Head of Health, Ageing & Human Services (HAHS), said: “Consumer perspectives will change. Solutions improving health in a holistic way over a period of time will gain more traction, with increasing focus on self-management. Consumers will increasingly demand control and seek to understand and influence treatment and referral decisions – and the new tools and platforms opening up, will give them the information and transparency to do this.

“In the long run we see much more virtual treatment at home. Affordable and user-friendly tele-health platform and in-home monitoring devices will enable health professionals to do this virtually – which is great news for regional areas. Precision medicine – taking into account individual variability in genes - will also become more prevalent given dramatic reductions in cost of genome sequencing. Fully exploiting the data will be a long-term proposition. And of course the 3D printing revolution, and the increases in AI will only continue and the current use of Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality will develop further.”

The report has a number of suggestions for healthcare organisations facing a future of unparalleled uncertainty and multiple possible outcomes. These include:

  • Have a clear vision and devise an actionable strategy which consider the conscious trade-offs that need to be made on relative focus areas, change initiatives and competencies.
  • Ensure you possess the necessary diverse leadership skills in your executive team to effect change and focus on collaboration and continuous improvement.
  • Assess how your current workforce may need to evolve future needs – especially the impact of digital labour and the collaboration between humans and technology – a wide array of news skills will be needed in future.
  • Identify opportunities to build relevant and sustainable partnerships with incubators, universities, research centres, the private sector, Health-Tech start-ups and global health networks.
  • Create a framework to support innovation including establishing an innovation centre or unit that is charged with understanding and experimenting with emerging trends (e.g. Quantum Computing, AI etc.) and implement successful PoCs. 
  • Enhance understanding of your patient experience and take a patient-centred approach. Develop partnerships and alliances that can integrate patient care ‘pathways’.
  • Increasingly, look to shift the locus of healthcare from adding inpatient beds to homecare, embracing remote healthcare solutions where possible.
  • Ensuring design principles of your healthcare facility are sufficiently flexible and future-ready for changing demographics, technologies and care pathways.
  • Process optimisation – a visual management system (eg process-mapping across people, process and technology) is needed to establish a baseline and measure change.

For this, cross-disciplinary teams are needed which collectively understand clinical implications, technical process improvement and robotic process automation.

Evan Rawstron, KPMG HAHS Partner said: ‘Healthcare is undergoing the biggest period of change in its history. Increasing consumer demands, demographic shifts, changing patterns of disease, new models of care, and rapidly emerging technologies are creating a more complex environment for clinicians, researchers and health service operators. The leading health systems and services will be those which identify the key trends early, and respond effectively through measured adoption of the right technologies at the right time”.

For further information

Ian Welch
KPMG Communications
0400 818 891
iwelch@kpmg.com.au
 

Connect with us

 

Request for proposal

 

Submit